US Army Corps of Engineers
Jacksonville District

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Archive: April, 2014
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  • April

    8th Annual Air Potato Roundup raises awareness about invasive species

    Volunteers observed National Invasive Species Awareness Week in a “hands-on” way, by participating in the 8th Annual Air Potato Roundup March 1, hosted by the First Coast Invasive Working Group.
  • Jacksonville District team members employ the Golden Rule

    Inside the South Florida Operations Office (SFOO) in Clewiston, Chester “Wayne” Sullivan has earned respect as a civil technician, but he is also greatly admired for his smooth and easy-going manner in communicating with others.
  • Tarpon Springs project protects infrastructure, hurricane evacuation route

    Fifteen years after its initial start and nearly 10 years after the execution of the Feasibility Cost Sharing Agreement (FCSA) with the city of Tarpon Springs, Jacksonville District completed construction on the Whitcomb and Kreamer Bayous Hurricane and Storm Damage Reduction Project. The project, located in Tarpon Springs, is a Continuing Authorities Program (CAP) Section 103 Hurricane and Storm Damage Protection Project.
  • Working together to combat invasive species

    The Florida Invasive Species Partnership (FISP) is a collaborative group of federal, state and local agencies and non-government organizations, all with a stake in managing non-native species in Florida. As stated on the FISP website, “Because species can spread beyond fence lines, our goal is to connect private landowners and public land managers with invasive species expertise and assistance programs across boundaries...FISP increases communication, coordination and the sharing of resources to protect Florida's natural landscape.”
  • Two shore protection projects completed

    In November 2013, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District began an unprecedented project in Broward County to reconstruct 5.1 miles of eroded shoreline. The project, completed Feb. 28, was the first of its kind because it included 10,000 truck deliveries of sand from a mine in central Florida. The district uses the dredge delivery method to renourish federal beaches, but this project had to be completed prior to hurricane season and all dredges had been deployed to other projects.
  • Draft Everglades System Status Report available for public review

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the South Florida Water Management District — the two