US Army Corps of Engineers
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BBSEER Public Scoping Meetings and Comment Period

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District announces two public scoping meetings and the opening of the public scoping comment period for the Biscayne Bay and Southeastern Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (BBSEER) Feasibility Study. Public scoping comments are due October 1, 2020.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is in the initial scoping phase of the preparation of an integrated Project Implementation Report (PIR) and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) document for the Biscayne Bay and Southeastern Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (BBSEER) Feasibility Study, part of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP). The South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) is the non-federal sponsor of this Feasibility Study.

The BBSEER Feasibility Study is focused on formulating plans to restore parts of the south Florida ecosystem in freshwater wetlands of the Southern Glades and Model Lands, the coastal wetlands and subtidal areas, including mangrove and seagrass areas, of Biscayne Bay, Biscayne National Park, Manatee Bay, Card Sound and Barnes Sound. These areas have been affected by over-drainage and by damaging freshwater releases from canals, such as the C-111 Canal.

The Corps invites the participation of federal, state and local agencies, Native American Tribes, interested parties and individuals to provide comments and to identify any issues or concerns during this public scoping period.

Please submit scoping comments BBSEERComments@usace.army.mil by October 1, 2020. All scoping comments should include “BBSEER Scoping Comments” in the subject line.

The Corps will host two BBSEER virtual public scoping meetings, and pre-registration in advance is required for each meeting.

WATCH THE VIDEO from the Sept. 15, 2020 BBSEER Public Scoping Meeting

WATCH THE VIDEO from the Sept. 16, 2020 BBSEER Public Scoping Meeting

View the presentation from the Sept. 15 and 16, 2020 Virtual Public Scoping Meeting
note: large file may take a few minutes to open

BBSEER Virtual Public Scoping Meeting
Tuesday, September 15, 2020
6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.
PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED
Register at this link:
https://ems8.intellor.com?do=register&t=1&p=832434 UPDATED LINK!

BBSEER Virtual Public Scoping Meeting
Wednesday, September 16, 2020
12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m.
PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED:
Register at this link:
https://ems8.intellor.com?do=register&t=1&p=832437 UPDATED LINK!

Biscayne Bay Southeastern Everglades Restoration (BBSEER)

The Biscayne Bay Southeastern Everglades Restoration (BBSEER) Project, a part of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP), that seeks to protect and restore the remaining Everglades ecosystem while providing for other water-related needs in the region, is being undertaken in partnership with the South Florida Water Management District.   

The construction of roads, railways and ditches, along with the connection of the South Dade Conveyance System to the sea through the C-111 canal, dramatically altered the distribution of freshwater across the landscape of Southeastern Florida. These man-made barriers and drainage features starved some areas of freshwater and increased the supply to others converting what was a healthy productive aquatic ecosystem into a distressed environment. 

The purpose of the BBSEER project will be to improve the quantity, quality, timing and distribution of freshwater to estuarine and nearshore subtidal areas, including mangrove and seagrass areas, of Biscayne Bay, Biscayne National Park, Card Sound, Barnes Sound and Manatee Bay.  This project will also seek to improve hydroperiods and freshwater marsh habitat in the Model Lands and Southern Glades, to re-establish hydrological and ecological connectivity between these areas and to improve the resiliency of these important marsh and coastal habitats to future sea level change.

Implementation of the project will provide multiple benefits to the aquatic environment including improved habitat for juvenile and prey-fish species, improved conditions for recreationally and commercially important aquatic species and fish and improved habitat for wading birds that were once common in this area prior to extensive drainage, all while maintaining the current level of flood protection.