US Army Corps of Engineers
Jacksonville District

Miami Harbor Navigation Improvement Study

The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of potential navigation improvements to Miami Harbor. Current alternatives under consideration in addition to the no action plan include widening and/or deepening specific areas within Miami’s federally authorized channels. Issues that are anticipated include concern for hardbottom/reef communities, turbidity and sedimentation associated with dredging operations, seagrasses, threatened and endangered species, and cultural, commercial and recreational resources.


Submit comments anytime via CESAJ-MiamiHarbor@usace.army.mil.  Join our study mailing list also to receive status updates.

 

April 26 2019 Status Update Meeting

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District staff will host a public teleconference April 26 from 11 a.m. to noon to provide an update on the ongoing Miami Harbor Navigation Improvement Study and to provide information on the study progress and upcoming milestones. The April 26 update will review ongoing and future engineering, economic, and environmental tasks. Members of the public can join the call by dialing 1-877-336-1831 using access code 6046670 and security code 1234.  View the presentation for the meeting.

Nov. 7 2018 Scoping Meeting Posters

     
Economic Considerations Engineering Considerations Environmental Considerations
Benefits and Costs Design and Construction Assessment, Avoidance & Minimization
Miami Harbor Economic Considerations Miami Harbor Engineering Considerations Miami Harbor Environmental Considerations
     

Miami Harbor Navigation Improvement Study

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District will host two National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) scoping meetings for the Miami Harbor Navigation Improvement Study. The meetings will be held on Wednesday, November 7 at Cruise Terminal F on Port Miami, 1103 North Cruise Blvd., Miami, Fla. 33132 (complimentary parking in Lot G). The first meeting will take place from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. and the second meeting from 6 to 8 p.m. The information at both meetings will be the same.

The purpose of the scoping meeting is to present and discuss the production of a NEPA document for the feasibility study, and to assess the effects of potential navigation improvements to Miami Harbor. The scoping meetings will aid in determining the scope of the NEPA analysis and any potentially significant issues. The NEPA process will also identify alternatives and information needed to evaluate alternatives. Alternatives under consideration for the study include:

1.) No action;

2.) widening and/or deepening of specific areas within Miami Harbor’s federally authorized channels, including: the Outer Entrance Channel Flare, Outer Entrance Channel, Elbow, Fisherman’s Channel, and Dodge-Lummus Island Turning basin.

Issues that are anticipated include concern for hardbottom/reef communities, turbidity and sedimentation associated with dredging operations, seagrasses, threatened and endangered species, and cultural, commercial and recreational resources.

We welcome views, questions, comments, concerns and suggestions. The Corps believes this study will benefit significantly from public involvement and encourages participation in the NEPA scoping process. Letters of comment or inquiry should be sent to CESAJ-MiamiHarbor@usace.army.mil or be addressed to the Planning Division, Environmental Branch, Jacksonville District, 701 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville, FL 32207, by Monday, November 26.

Contact Info

561-340-1527

Progress Update

The Corps and Port Miami are working closely and coordinating weekly with the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) scientists as post construction impact assessments continue at Miami Harbor. The impact assessment protocol is posted above and details the type of data that have been collected and the location of the various data collection sites. 

These data enable an assessment of the presence and severity of potentially project-related sedimentation at each site, which can be used in conjunction with information on benthic communities (condition of organism) to determine adverse effects of the project on hardbottom and coral reef resources.

The biological data assessment is still underway by the FDEP and NMFS.