US Army Corps of Engineers
Jacksonville District

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Archive: July, 2014
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  • July

    Morey’s ability to communicate through graphics provides invaluable service

    Behind the scenes at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District, technical writer/editor Patrice Morey is busy working with her teammates to effectively communicate intricate plans through the informational products and graphics she creates and the edits she provides to technical reports.
  • Corps water safety volunteers save lives

    This is the first year Bill and Jamie Wagner have volunteered in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ water safety program, but they put on a show that leaves a lasting impression.
  • Water managers prepare for wet season

    An early start to the wet season in 2013 kept the lake from dropping below 13 feet – its lowest point last year was 13.29 feet on May 27. The loss of water storage capacity became evident when the lake started rising, and the district was left with little choice but to discharge the water in case a tropical system developed that would result in additional heavy rains.
  • Congress authorizes eight Jacksonville District projects

    Eight U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District projects that will provide critical infrastructure to local ports and ecosystem restoration efforts in Florida received approval as part of the Water Resources Reform and Development Act (WRRDA) of 2014, which was signed by President Barack Obama June 10.
  • Florida II provides capability to perform important archaeological research

    The Florida II is a survey vessel, but it has the capability to provide much more information than just water depth. The design specifications and specialized equipment it carries make it possible to do many different types of surveys, and suitable for underwater archaeological research.
  • Corps makes good progress on Miami Harbor project

    Progress is moving swiftly with the Miami Harbor deepening and widening project, including the successful construction of artificial reefs and relocation of about 1,000 healthy corals.