US Army Corps of Engineers
Jacksonville District Website

Sunny Isles Beach

Sunny Isles Beach The 2.4-mile length of the Sunny Isles segment was added to the  Dade County Beach Erosion Control and Hurricane Protection Project project in 1985. Construction of Sunny Isles Beach took place between 1987 and 1988, but the 2017 beach renourishment project was the first truck haul for this segment.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District awarded a contract on Jan 26 to Eastman Aggregate Enterprises, LLC of Lake Worth, Florida, for $14,040,069.05, for the Sunny Isles Beach shoreline renourishment project, part of the Miami-Dade County Beach Erosion Control and Hurricane Protection Project.

Eastman Aggregate will renourish eroded shoreline in Sunny Isles Beach, using trucks to haul beach-quality sand from an upland sand mine. The project is 100 percent federally funded via the Flood Control and Coastal Emergency Act (Public Law 84-99) and the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 (Public Law 115-123).

The contractor will place an estimated 280,000 cubic yards of beach-quality sand on approximately 2.3 miles of eroded shoreline in Sunny Isles Beach, to protect the shoreline during seasonal storms as well as tropical storms and hurricanes.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District awarded a contract on August 9, 2017 to Eastman Aggregate Enterprises, LLC of Lake Worth, Florida, for $8,605,564.33, for the Sunny Isles Beach shoreline renourishment project, part of the Miami-Dade County Beach Erosion Control and Hurricane Protection Project. Eastman Aggregate renourished two critically eroded areas of shoreline in Sunny Isles Beach with 140,000 cubic yards of beach-quality sand truck-hauled from an upland sand mine. A public meeting was held on August 31, 2017.

 

Dade County Beach Erosion Control and Hurricane Protection Project

Flagler County ShorelineDade County officials requested federal assistance with shore erosion about 50 years ago, and Congress authorized the Corps of Engineers to construct the Dade County Beach Erosion Control and Hurricane Protection Project in 1968.

The Dade County project provided for the placement of beach fill along 9.3-miles of shoreline extending from Bakers Haulover Inlet to Government Cut and along the 1.4-mile length of Haulover Beach Park located immediately north of Bakers Haulover Inlet. The 2.4-mile length of the Sunny Isles segment was added to the project in 1985 under a separate authorization.

All major sand sources offshore of Miami-Dade County have now been exhausted with the completion of the latest nourishment contract in the Bal Harbour area in 2014. The Corps and local and state coastal officials estimate that an additional 3.6 million cubic yards of sand is needed for the remaining federal participation, which is ten years for the Government Cut to Baker’s Haulover Beach Park segment and 23 years for the Sunny Isles segment.

Section 935 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 and a Congressional directive from 1999 indicate that the Corps can only use domestic sources of sand for renourishment of this project, unless domestic sources are not available for environmental or economic reasons. To utilize new sand sources, the Corps has to complete a Limited Reevaluation Report (LRR) and Environmental Assessment (EA) with updated economics to justify the more distant and costly sand sources for the future.