US Army Corps of Engineers
Jacksonville District Website

Fort George Inlet Erosion Control Project

Fort George Inlet


The Fort George Inlet Section 111 Project will investigate opportunities to reduce the continued shoreline erosion of Little Talbot Island along with exploring beneficial use of dredge material opportunities to restore eroded property that has been lost. The proposed project is authorized under Section 111 of the Continuing Authorities Program (CAP), which authorizes the Corps to investigate and construct projects for the prevention or mitigation of damage to non-federal public and privately owned shores to the extent that such damages can be attributed to federal navigation works. The primary federal structure adjacent to Fort George Inlet is the north jetty of Jacksonville Harbor, which was originally constructed in 1886. The Corps is investigating the benefits of a cost-sharing arrangement with the Florida Park Service (Little Talbot) to investigate the current condition of the inlet and Talbot Island, and to assess the costs, impacts, benefits and general feasibility of undertaking such a project.

Fort George Inlet Erosion Control Project Scoping Meeting and Public Comment

Fort George Inlet Erosion Control Project
Duval County Continuing Authorities Program (CAP) Section 111
Scoping Meeting Fact Sheet - February 19, 2020

The Fort George Inlet Section 111 Project will investigate opportunities to reduce the continued shoreline erosion of Little Talbot Island along with exploring beneficial use of dredge material opportunities to restore eroded property that has been lost.

The primary federal structure adjacent to Fort George Inlet is the north jetty of Jacksonville Harbor, which was originally constructed as a “flow permeable” jetty in 1886. In the years and decades that followed, the shoreline north of the inlet experienced severe erosion, exposing the submerged jetty, and resulting in significant shoaling in the federal navigation channel. Additional groins were constructed to address these impacts to the federal navigation channel.

In 1934, the jetty was capped and made impermeable to halt the migration of material into the channel.  As a result, the inlet began a continuous migration north and the southern tip of Little Talbot Island began continuously eroding. The sand accumulation north of the inlet created today’s Huguenot Memorial Park, which is operated by the City of Jacksonville.

The proposed project is authorized under Section 111 of the Continuing Authorities Program (CAP), which authorizes the Corps to investigate and construct projects for the prevention or mitigation of damage to non-federal public and privately owned shores to the extent that such damages can be attributed to federal navigation works.

The Corps is investigating the benefits of a cost-sharing arrangement with the Florida Park Service (Little Talbot) to investigate the current condition of the inlet and Talbot Island, and to assess the costs, impacts, benefits and general feasibility of undertaking such a project.

STUDY OBJECTIVES

  • Reduce or eliminate additional loss of state park lands. 
  • Stabilize inlet flow to inhibit further erosion.
  • Determine any beneficial use opportunities for dredging beach compatible sand for placement on critically eroded area beaches, such as Little Talbot Island, a practice known as Regional Sediment Management, to support coastal resilience and robust habitat.

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969

NEPA is an overarching concept that includes consideration and compliance with multiple other environmental acts (e.g.: Endangered Species Act of 1973, Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act of 1976, National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, etc.) NEPA also requires federal agencies to disclose proposed actions and alternatives to the public, and consider, evaluate and document the effects of proposed actions as part of an overall planning and decision-making endeavor. Under NEPA, the Corps of Engineers is committed to cooperate with federal, state and local governments and agencies, with private and public organizations, and with concerned private citizens to seek their input.

The project's scoping period was held from January 31, 2020 through March 1, 2020.  The scoping period allowed the Corps to collect input from diverse sources for consideration during the planning and development stages of a project. Input received during the scoping period is being considered during the development of project alternatives and the evaluation of those alternatives for potential effects to environmental, economic, and social resources.

SEND WRITTEN COMMENTS BY MARCH 1, 2020, TO:

JASON HARRAH, Project Manager
P.O. Box 4970
Jacksonville, FL 32232
Jason.S.Harrah@usace.army.mil