US Army Corps of Engineers
Jacksonville District Website

African American/Black History Month

Published Feb. 11, 2013
Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts (right) administers the oath of office to President Barack Obama during the inaugural swearing-in ceremony at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., Jan. 21, 2013. First Lady Michelle Obama holds a Bible that belonged to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and the Lincoln Bible, which was used at President Obama’s 2009 inaugural ceremony. Daughters Malia and Sasha stand with their parents.

Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts (right) administers the oath of office to President Barack Obama during the inaugural swearing-in ceremony at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., Jan. 21, 2013. First Lady Michelle Obama holds a Bible that belonged to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and the Lincoln Bible, which was used at President Obama’s 2009 inaugural ceremony. Daughters Malia and Sasha stand with their parents.

In 2013, the United States will commemorate two events that changed the course of the nation—the 1863 Emancipation Proclamation and the 1963 March on Washington. 

These milestone events in American history were the culmination of decades of struggles by individuals—both famous and unknown—who believed in the American promise that this nation was “dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.”

In 2013, the United States will commemorate two events that changed the course of the nation—the 1863 Emancipation Proclamation and the 1963 March on Washington. These milestone events in American history were the culmination of decades of struggles by individuals—both famous and unknown—who believed in the American promise that this nation was “dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.”

In observance of African American/Black History Month, which takes place Feb. 1-28, 2013,  Jacksonville District’s Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Office has planned several events with the theme, “At the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality:  The Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington.”  Mayor Alvin Brown of the city of Jacksonville is the keynote speaker for a program scheduled for Wednesday, Feb. 27 from 10 to 11 a.m. 

Regulatory Division will defend its Black History Month Brain Brawl championship title when it all goes down on Friday, Feb. 15 beginning at 11 a.m. Gerald DeLoach, an electrical engineer in the mechanical and electrical section has been a Brain Brawl participant and team captain in past years. This year, he repeats his role as executive producer and host.

“It’s a spirited, competitive way to enrich everyone’s understanding of African American/Black History Month,” said DeLoach. “We invite everyone to participate in some way, whether as a captain, a team member or in the audience supporting the teams. You are sure to learn something you didn’t know before, and will have fun doing it!”

To practice for the Brain Brawl and test your knowledge of the Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington, “Like” the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District Facebook page, where African American/Black History Month questions will be posted between Feb. 1 and Feb. 15.

The enduring symbolic importance of the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863 and the March on Washington in 1963 was highlighted during President Obama’s second inaugural ceremony, held Jan. 21. Obama selected President Abraham Lincoln’s Bible and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s traveling Bible when he took the oath of office Jan. 21, the holiday observed in remembrance of King.