US Army Corps of Engineers
Jacksonville District

Results:
Archive: 2018
Clear
  • Corps awards contract for dike rehabilitation in Glades County

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District has awarded a contract to replace a water control structure in Glades County as part of the ongoing Herbert Hoover Dike Rehabilitation project.
  • USACE announces pulse release schedule for Lake Okeechobee

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Jacksonville District announces the pulse release schedule for water releases from Lake Okeechobee to take effect Friday. This decision will be in effect until further notice.
  • USACE to reduce flows from Lake Okeechobee

    Starting Friday, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District will reduce flows from Lake Okeechobee to the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie Estuaries.
  • Corps releases draft report on OWW Master Plan update for review; Public workshop scheduled

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District released the Draft Environmental Assessment (EA) and Proposed Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for updating the 1986 Okeechobee Waterway (OWW) and Lake Okeechobee (LO) Master Plan. A public workshop is scheduled in LaBelle and public comment will be accepted through September 21, 2018.
  • USACE updates officials in Puerto Rico on hurricane recovery projects

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Jacksonville District’s Commander and Deputy Commander for the Antilles provided an update for officials regarding $2.5 billion infrastructure projects designed to manage flood risk on the island. Over the past several days, Jacksonville District Commander Col. Jason Kirk and Antilles Deputy Maj. Alexander Walker-Rodriguez provided updates on infrastructure projects and studies that will reduce flood risk to officials that included Lieutenant Gov. Luis Rivera-Marin, Natural & Environmental Resources Secretary Tania Vazquez-Ruiz, and Omar Marrero, Executive Director of the Central Office for Recovery, Reconstruction and Resiliency.
  • Corps announces public meetings for Lake Okeechobee Watershed study

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District announces a series of public meetings for the Draft Integrated Project Implementation Report (PIR) and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Lake Okeechobee Watershed Restoration Project (LOWRP).
  • USACE adjusts release schedule for Lake Okeechobee

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Jacksonville District has adjusted flows on the 14-day water release schedule from Lake Okeechobee.
  • USACE announces 14-day pulse release schedule for Lake O releases

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Jacksonville District announces the 14-day pulse release schedule for water releases from Lake Okeechobee, scheduled to resume on Friday.
  • USACE to continue managing flood risk with releases from Lake Okeechobee

    With Lake Okeechobee approaching 14.5 feet, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Jacksonville District will resume water releases this weekend as part of its continued efforts to manage flood risk throughout south Florida. The discharges are scheduled to resume Friday (July 13). The target flow for the Caloosahatchee Estuary is a 14-day average of 3,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) as measured at Moore Haven Lock (S-77) located in the southwest part of the lake. The target flow for the St. Lucie Estuary is a 14-day average of 1,800 cfs as measured at St. Lucie Lock (S-80) near Stuart. Additional runoff from rain in the St. Lucie basin could occasionally result in flows that exceed the target.
  • Corps to suspend flows from Lake Okeechobee

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District will suspend water releases from Lake Okeechobee to the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie Estuaries effective Monday morning. The Corps will pause discharges at 7 a.m. on Monday to allow water managers to conduct a full assessment of system conditions. While no water will be released from Lake Okeechobee, the Corps will continue to allow runoff from rain that accumulates in the Caloosahatchee or St. Lucie basins to pass through downstream structures.