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Tag: Lake Okeechobee
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  • June

    Col. Kelly on Lake Okeechobee: balancing project purposes

    One of the challenges we face at the Jacksonville District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is balancing all of the purposes of managing Lake Okeechobee given to us by Congress – flood control, water supply, navigation, recreation, and preservation of fish and wildlife resources. As we enter rainy season, we will keep focusing on balancing the purposes of lake water management and setting favorable conditions.
  • Lake Okeechobee Update for 2020 Rainy Season

    After a drier than normal dry season, Lake Okeechobee operations transition to rainy season without plans for imminent large releases to estuaries.
  • March

    Corps defends against invasive lizards

    Cold-stunned green iguanas, dubbed “chicken of the trees,” made national headlines as they fell from the trees in south Florida during a recent cold snap. News stories and social media helped to raise public awareness about the damage that can be wrought by the large invasive lizards, which can reach more than five feet and twenty pounds. According to the media reports, these invaders weren’t just munching their way through the succulent plants of south Florida’s gardens, they also wreaked havoc on private properties and important public infrastructure, shorting out power lines and burrowing under structures, causing some of them to collapse. In one city, they reportedly contributed enough damage to a water control structure that the repair bill reached $1.8 million. Construction, rehabilitation and maintenance of critical infrastructure are key missions for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which is responsible for the 143-mile Herbert Hoover Dike around Lake Okeechobee, five navigation locks and dams and recreation areas along the 154-mile long Okeechobee Waterway, and Everglades restoration. Maintaining the integrity of these structures and protecting them from damage is integral to the success of these missions.
  • USACE continues work on LORS deviation

    After he took charge of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District in 2018, Col. Andrew Kelly charged his team to look for tools that would offer different options for the management of water in Lake Okeechobee during times when harmful algal blooms (HABs) were present. Significant HAB events affected Lake Okeechobee and the coastal estuaries in 2016 and 2018. Jacksonville District engineers and biologists reviewed the Lake Okeechobee Regulation Schedule (LORS) and looked for potential tools to adjust operations in anticipation of possible future HAB events. Last summer, Jacksonville District rolled out a proposed deviation to LORS that would provide greater flexibility in the management of water with the goal of reducing the health risk to the public associated with HABs.
  • December

    USACE updates dry-season approach for Lake Okeechobee

    The water management team at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is now focused on the year ahead and the challenges that we face. Unlike last year, our focus this year will be on retaining water during the dry season.
  • November

    A successful year for Lake Okeechobee

    At this time last year, Jacksonville District was a month into executing operational flexibility for Lake Okeechobee aimed at drawing the lake down. What a difference a year makes.
  • August

    Progress through working together

    The nation is at its best when we work together to tackle challenges that we face. We understand the frustration that many feel but do not lose sight of the fact that we are making tangible progress. With your continued valuable input, we will maintain the increasing momentum towards success. Working together, we can restore America’s Everglades and build an improved water management system that better meets the multiple water needs of Floridians in the 21st Century and beyond.
  • June

    Why we release water

    One of the primary reasons we release water is to reduce flood risk for people living and working around the lake, in which the potential for inflows far exceeds (six times greater) our capacity for outflow.
  • January

    Additional progress on Everglades restoration expected in 2018

    Jacksonville District Commander Col. Jason Kirk provides an update on ecosystem restoration activities in south Florida.
  • September

    USACE South Florida Operations staff inspects Herbert Hoover Dike and Okeechobee Waterway

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District’s South Florida Operations staff has the monumental task or inspecting the Herbert Hoover Dike and reopening Okeechobee Waterway post Hurricane Irma, a task that is essential to recovery operations across Southern Florida.
  • May

    Lake O water levels fall to start 2017

    An extended period of dry weather since Hurricane Matthew in October has caused the water level in Lake Okeechobee to steadily recede over the past six months. This, in sharp comparison to last year’s dry season that contained some of the wettest months ever recorded in the region.
  • July

    Corps must remain vigilant in managing Lake O

    Water—in south Florida, we either have too much or too little. For most of 2016, heavy rains fueled by El Nino mean we’ve had too much. The flood control system operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the South Florida Water Management District has prevented loss of life and major widespread property damage so far this year. However, we remain concerned about how much rain may fall and where that water can go without causing impacts that have the potential to be worse than current conditions in south Florida estuaries.
  • April

    Army Corps of Engineers: Restoring the Environment, Increasing Resiliency

    As commander of the Jacksonville District's 780-member team of professionals, I want to share information about our efforts to restore the environment and to help our nation face the challenges posed by rising sea levels.
  • July

    Turner visits south Florida

    USACE South Atlantic Division Commander Brig. Gen. David Turner visited ecosystem restoration and flood risk reduction projects in south Florida on June 23-24.
  • December

    Tussock removal

    A half-acre tussock was blown by the wind, and completely blocked the navigation channel of Rim Canal Route 2 of the Okeechobee Waterway, on the south side of Lake Okeechobee. The Okeechobee Waterway is a navigable waterway that cuts across the state, from the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway to the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. The tug boat Leitner, with Capt. Graham Thompson at the helm, pushed a barge-mounted crane with a crew of three into position. The team successfully broke up and removed the tussock, restoring navigation on the Okeechobee Waterway.
  • July

    Water managers prepare for wet season

    An early start to the wet season in 2013 kept the lake from dropping below 13 feet – its lowest point last year was 13.29 feet on May 27. The loss of water storage capacity became evident when the lake started rising, and the district was left with little choice but to discharge the water in case a tropical system developed that would result in additional heavy rains.
  • February

    2014 promises to be busy year for dike rehabilitation

    2014 is shaping up to be a very busy year for rehabilitation at the dike. Jacksonville District continues to press on with construction projects, and will move closer toward completing a study that will provide options on the remaining measures needed to reduce the risk of dike failure.
  • January

    Engineering Division: Hard work results in significant achievements

    “It was a big year for execution,” said Laureen Borochaner, chief of Jacksonville District’s Engineering Division. “We already had plenty of work, and then took on a lot of additional, unplanned work besides. Much of that work was in-house design of complex major projects.”
  • Another banner year for district’s ecosystem restoration program

    With major contract awards, dedication ceremonies and the completion of the first Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) project this past year, it is safe to say that 2013 was a busy and productive year for Jacksonville District’s ecosystem restoration program.
  • Operations Division overcomes challenges

    “2013 was a year full of challenges,” said Jim Jeffords, Operations Division chief. “Our biggest challenge was the historical rain event that occurred from April to July. The event tested all aspects of the district – our water managers, inspections of the dike, emergency operations, dam safety and corporate communications.”