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Tag: Jacksonville District
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  • January

    Ports are focus of national spotlight in 2012

    Ports were thrust into the national spotlight in 2012 after President Obama announced the “We Can’t Wait” Initiative, which placed several of Jacksonville District’s port projects and studies onto the fast track for implementation. As a part of the initiative, President Obama identified seven nationally and regionally significant infrastructure projects to be expedited to help modernize and expand five major ports in the United States, including the port of Jacksonville and the port of Miami.
  • Everglades restoration takes several leaps forward

    For Everglades restoration, the year started off with lots of excitement and momentum as the Central Everglades Planning Project (CEPP) accelerated, with the ambitious goal of delivering – within two years – finalized plans for congressional authorization for a suite of restoration projects in the central Everglades.
  • December

    Corps lock leader receives Steel de Fleury Medal

    U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District employee Michael L. Carter received the prestigious military engineer award, the Steel de Fleury Medal, Dec. 19 for his significant contributions to the district over the course of his 32-year career with the Corps.
  • Cooperative agreement promises to aid both manatees and navigation

    During an informal signing ceremony, Jacksonville District Commander Col. Alan Dodd added his name to a cooperative agreement along with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Florida field office supervisors to help manatees and insure the Corps' navigation mission moves forward. The group used the authority provided in the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) to develop a cooperative agreement which provides both agencies flexibility when developing real world solutions to help the manatee in the face of growing pressure.
  • Jacksonville District’s Housing Planning Response Team on the scene in New Jersey

    Within days of Hurricane Sandy’s landfall, which reaped devastating effects across the northeastern seaboard, a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District team was among the many national Corps responders to arrive on the scene to provide welcomed relief and assistance.
  • Jacksonville District uses unique technology to search for munitions debris

    A large munitions response site, coupled with heavy vegetation and hazardous wildlife, provided ideal conditions for Jacksonville District to use a helicopter magnetometer for initial fieldwork at the Avon Park Formerly Used Defense Site Sept. 28.
  • Corps responds to Superstorm Sandy

    Hurricane Sandy was the biggest storm yet of an active tropical storm season. It formed south of Jamaica on Oct. 22, smashed through Cuba Oct. 24-25 and began affecting beaches in Florida by Oct. 26. As it moved further north, concern heighted as it merged with another storm, prior to making landfall near Atlantic City, N.J. Oct. 29. Jacksonville District engineers were on alert from the beginning. The district activated its emergency operations center (EOC) Oct. 24 and closely monitored the storm as it moved through the Bahamas. Once reports started circulating about the full range of impacts in New York and New Jersey, several Jacksonville District team members were tapped for duties in a variety of locations.
  • October

    UAV Program Conducts Successful Demonstration

    Nearly 40 people from Jacksonville District and other federal agencies were able to witness the award-winning Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) system during a demonstration on September 5 near St. Augustine.
  • September

    Major construction milestone achieved at Tamiami Trail

    A major milestone for the Tamiami Trail Modifications project was reached shortly after midnight July 13 as the first concrete pour on the bridge deck was completed.
  • January

    NOVA UAV program soars

    “The NOVA has been developed to provide a technological edge for us,” said Larry Taylor, NOVA UAV program manager. “Its specialty is detecting and monitoring change over time. We have used it for levee monitoring; we have detected anomalies in the levees that weren’t detected by ground observation.” In addition to the levee monitoring the NOVA has also been used for wildlife surveys, regulatory permit reconnaissance, invasive species contract assessments and invasive species acreage estimation.