US Army Corps of Engineers
Jacksonville District

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  • Corps continues prepping for Irma; issues guidance to boaters and campers

    As Hurricane Irma approaches, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District is preparing to respond as needed and providing information to boaters and campers on operational adjustments that will take place at navigation locks and recreation facilities.
  • Corps to release water from Lake Okeechobee in advance of Irma

    As Hurricane Irma makes its way across the Atlantic, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District has begun a pre-storm drawdown that includes water releases from Lake Okeechobee.
  • Corps urges boaters to use caution on Okeechobee Waterway

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District is advising boaters on Lake Okeechobee that the low water level is now creating hazardous navigation conditions. The Corps issued a Notice to Navigation on Thursday (May 25), advising commercial and recreational vessels to use extreme caution while traveling Okeechobee Waterway Routes 1 and 2 between Port Mayaca and Clewiston. Route 1 goes directly across the lake, while Route 2 runs along the southern edge of the lake through Pahokee, Belle Glade, South Bay, and Clewiston.
  • Corps adjusts flows to Caloosahatchee Estuary

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District has adjusted the amount of water flowing from Lake Okeechobee to the Caloosahatchee Estuary. The Corps began a new seven-day pulse release Friday (May 19) to the Caloosahatchee Estuary with a target flow averaging 375 cubic feet per second (cfs) as measured at W.P. Franklin Lock (S-79) near Fort Myers. No water from the lake is being released through St. Lucie Lock (S-80) near Stuart.
  • Corps reduces flows to Caloosahatchee Estuary

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District has further reduced the amount of water flowing from Lake Okeechobee to the Caloosahatchee Estuary. The Corps began a new seven-day pulse release Friday (April 14) to the Caloosahatchee Estuary with a target flow averaging 300 cubic feet per second (cfs) as measured at W.P. Franklin Lock (S-79) near Fort Myers.
  • Corps reduces flows to Caloosahatchee Estuary

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District started a new seven-day pulse release today (March 31) to the Caloosahatchee Estuary with a target flow averaging 450 cubic feet per second (cfs) as measured at W.P. Franklin Lock (S-79) near Fort Myers.
  • Jacksonville District commander talks about south Florida programs

    Col. Jason Kirk, commander of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District, talked with reporters this afternoon about ongoing efforts to rehabilitate the Herbert Hoover Dike surrounding Lake Okeechobee and implement the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) and other components of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Program.
  • Corps to reduce flows to Caloosahatchee Estuary

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District will begin dry-season flows from Lake Okeechobee to the Caloosahatchee Estuary starting Friday (Nov. 11). The new target flow for the Caloosahatchee Estuary will be a seven-day average of 650 cubic feet per second (cfs) as measured at W.P. Franklin Lock (S-79) near Fort Myers. No water from the lake is expected to be released through St. Lucie Lock (S-80) near Stuart.
  • Corps to suspend flows to St. Lucie; reduce flows to Caloosahatchee

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District will suspend flows from Lake Okeechobee to the St. Lucie Estuary and reduce flows to the Caloosahatchee Estuary. The adjustment in discharges will take place tomorrow (Nov. 4). The new target flow for the Caloosahatchee Estuary will be a seven-day average of 1,425 cubic feet per second (cfs) as measured at W.P. Franklin Lock (S-79) near Fort Myers. No water from the lake will be released through St. Lucie Lock (S-80) near Stuart.
  • Corps to reduce flows from Lake Okeechobee

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District plans to reduce flows from Lake Okeechobee this weekend as it begins a transition toward dry-season operations. Starting Friday (Oct. 28), the target flow for the Caloosahatchee Estuary will be reduced to a seven-day average of 2,800 cubic feet per second (cfs) as measured at W.P. Franklin Lock & Dam (S-79) located near Fort Myers. The target flow for the St. Lucie Estuary will be reduced to a seven-day average of 800 cfs as measured at St. Lucie Lock & Dam (S-80) near Stuart.