US Army Corps of Engineers
Jacksonville District Website

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  • USACE announces dry-season strategy for Lake O water management

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District has announced its strategy for management of water in Lake Okeechobee over the coming months. In a column posted to the Jacksonville District website December 19, Jacksonville District Commander Col. Andrew Kelly stated that the Corps would focus on retaining water in the lake while providing freshwater flows to the Caloosahatchee River as long as possible.
  • Corps maintains current flows from Lake Okeechobee

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District will maintain flows from Lake Okeechobee to the Caloosahatchee Estuary on the current schedule, releasing water in a pulse pattern that averages 650 cubic feet per second (cfs) over a seven-day period measured at the W.P. Franklin Lock and Dam (S-79). No releases are planned through the St. Lucie Lock and Dam (S-80).
  • Corps continues releases from Lake Okeechobee at current rates

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District will maintain the flow of water from Lake Okeechobee to the Caloosahatchee Estuary at current rates. The Corps plans to release water from the lake to the Caloosahatchee in a pulsing pattern that averages 650 cubic feet per second (cfs) over a seven-day period measured at the W.P. Franklin Lock and Dam (S-79). No releases are planned through the St. Lucie Lock and Dam (S-80).
  • Corps maintains current flow pattern from Lake Okeechobee

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District will maintain water releases from Lake Okeechobee at current rates for the Caloosahatchee Estuary. The Corps plans to target flows at a seven-day average of 650 cubic feet per second (cfs) measured at the W.P. Franklin Lock and Dam (S-79). No releases are planned through the St. Lucie Lock and Dam (S-80) at this time.
  • Corps invites public to provide input on new Lake Okeechobee System Operating Manual

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District invites the public to provide scoping input on the development of the new Lake Okeechobee System Operating Manual (LOSOM). A series of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) public scoping meetings will be held throughout south Florida during the month of February and public scoping comments will be accepted until March 31, 2019.
  • Corps opens Ortona Lock for navigation following completion of maintenance repairs

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District has resumed normal operations at the Ortona Lock on the Okeechobee Waterway, following completion of maintenance and repairs. Completion of the work allows the Corps to resume normal operations as of Sunday, June 17, locking vessels on demand between 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., with the last lockage beginning at 4:30 p.m., seven days a week.
  • Corps accepts public comment through March 31 regarding temporary lock closure

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District will accept public comment through March 31 regarding the temporary closure of the Ortona Lock in scheduled for June. The Corps has been accepting public comments on the proposal to temporarily close the Ortona Lock along the Okeechobee Waterway in south Florida for maintenance and repairs since the end of January.
  • Corps continues to reduce flows from Lake Okeechobee

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District will reduce flows from Lake Okeechobee. Starting Friday (Dec. 1), the target flow for the Caloosahatchee Estuary will be reduced to 4,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) as measured at Moore Haven Lock & Dam (S-77). The target flow for the St. Lucie Estuary will be reduced to 1,800 cfs as measured at St. Lucie Lock & Dam (S-80) near Stuart.
  • Corps to reduce flows from Lake Okeechobee

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District plans to reduce the amount of water flowing from Lake Okeechobee for the first time since releases were initiated following Hurricane Irma. Starting Friday (Nov. 17), the target flow for the Caloosahatchee Estuary will be set to 6,500 cubic feet per second (cfs) as measured at Moore Haven Lock & Dam (S-77). The target flow for the St. Lucie Estuary will be reduced to 2,800 cfs as measured at St. Lucie Lock & Dam (S-80) near Stuart.
  • Corps continues to address water challenges in south Florida

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers deputy commander for south Florida, Lt. Col. Jennifer Reynolds, told local elected officials this morning the agency continues to work through water management challenges in south Florida.