US Army Corps of Engineers
Jacksonville District Website

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Author: Erica Skolte
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  • March

    Corps defends against invasive lizards

    Cold-stunned green iguanas, dubbed “chicken of the trees,” made national headlines as they fell from the trees in south Florida during a recent cold snap. News stories and social media helped to raise public awareness about the damage that can be wrought by the large invasive lizards, which can reach more than five feet and twenty pounds. According to the media reports, these invaders weren’t just munching their way through the succulent plants of south Florida’s gardens, they also wreaked havoc on private properties and important public infrastructure, shorting out power lines and burrowing under structures, causing some of them to collapse. In one city, they reportedly contributed enough damage to a water control structure that the repair bill reached $1.8 million. Construction, rehabilitation and maintenance of critical infrastructure are key missions for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which is responsible for the 143-mile Herbert Hoover Dike around Lake Okeechobee, five navigation locks and dams and recreation areas along the 154-mile long Okeechobee Waterway, and Everglades restoration. Maintaining the integrity of these structures and protecting them from damage is integral to the success of these missions.
  • USACE continues work on LORS deviation

    After he took charge of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District in 2018, Col. Andrew Kelly charged his team to look for tools that would offer different options for the management of water in Lake Okeechobee during times when harmful algal blooms (HABs) were present. Significant HAB events affected Lake Okeechobee and the coastal estuaries in 2016 and 2018. Jacksonville District engineers and biologists reviewed the Lake Okeechobee Regulation Schedule (LORS) and looked for potential tools to adjust operations in anticipation of possible future HAB events. Last summer, Jacksonville District rolled out a proposed deviation to LORS that would provide greater flexibility in the management of water with the goal of reducing the health risk to the public associated with HABs.
  • May

    Industry Days connect businesses large and small

    Industry Day events hosted by the Jacksonville District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers provide networking and partnering opportunities for businesses small and large.
  • December

    Jacksonville District hosts Minister of Chinese Water Resources on a tour of America's Everglades

    A delegation of senior water management officials from the People’s Republic of China, including the Minister of Water Resources, toured the Everglades with representatives of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and partner agencies. The group discussed processes and progress in the United States’ largest ecosystem restoration program.
  • Jacksonville District hosts Minister of Chinese Water Resources on a tour of America's Everglades

    A delegation of senior water management officials from the People’s Republic of China, including the Minister of Water Resources, toured the Everglades with representatives of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and partner agencies. The group discussed processes and progress in the United States’ largest ecosystem restoration program.
  • July

    New pilings at Canaveral Lock a win-win

    The new pilings being driven into place at the Canaveral Lock are a win-win. Not only are they more environmentally friendly than traditional pilings, but they are expected to last longer and save money in the end.
  • June

    Partners Celebrate the Sand on Venice Beach

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers joined our partners to celebrate the completion of the Venice Beach renourishment project at “Celebrate the Sand” Friday, June 5 on Venice Beach.
  • January

    Year in review: Small business office

    During 2014, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District Small Business Office invested in contractors and businesses, hoping the return on investment would pay off in a big way.
  • December

    Corps attends south Florida outreach event

    Corps park ranger Brian Scott Older and water safety volunteers Michael and Terri Young, exhibited at Kiwanis Kids Day in Labelle, Florida educating attendees about the Corps’ mission and water safety. LaBelle is located along the Caloosahatchee River, which is part of the Okeechobee Waterway on the west side of Lake Okeechobee in south Florida.
  • Tussock removal

    A half-acre tussock was blown by the wind, and completely blocked the navigation channel of Rim Canal Route 2 of the Okeechobee Waterway, on the south side of Lake Okeechobee. The Okeechobee Waterway is a navigable waterway that cuts across the state, from the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway to the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. The tug boat Leitner, with Capt. Graham Thompson at the helm, pushed a barge-mounted crane with a crew of three into position. The team successfully broke up and removed the tussock, restoring navigation on the Okeechobee Waterway.
  • Mile Point Industry Day information educates contractors

    Due to the complexity and challenges of the Mile Point Reconfiguration project, project manager Jason Harrah knew it was important to engage and inform the industry about the project early on. An industry day was held in Jacksonville in November, to provide an opportunity for contractor representatives to learn about the details and requirements for the project.
  • Safety Office team helps employees maintain workplace health

    Expert industrial hygienists and safety technicians from the Safety Office know how to help keep Jacksonville District employees safe and healthy. They are ready, willing and able to educate Corps employees and share their knowledge with anyone who requests assistance.
  • Lock leader continues to serve, helps other veterans

    A retired Marine is not the kind of guy you would expect to pick up a crochet hook to create hundreds of “beanies,” many of them pink. But Kirschner, together with his wife Brianne, created the “Beanies for Vets” program He has cranked out hundreds of beanies, all to benefit veterans and several charities. He is currently working on a crocheted American flag.
  • September

    Everglades invasive species management summit provides a call to action

    Jacksonville District team members along with a diverse group of 143 members attended the 2014 Everglades Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (ECISMA) Summit, July 23- 24 in Davie, Fla. to learn about recent efforts and plan for the upcoming year.
  • July

    Corps water safety volunteers save lives

    This is the first year Bill and Jamie Wagner have volunteered in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ water safety program, but they put on a show that leaves a lasting impression.
  • Florida II provides capability to perform important archaeological research

    The Florida II is a survey vessel, but it has the capability to provide much more information than just water depth. The design specifications and specialized equipment it carries make it possible to do many different types of surveys, and suitable for underwater archaeological research.
  • June

    Corps team members live the Army Values

    One man grew up in a small town in Virginia and the other was raised near New York City. Despite the differences in their backgrounds, they became men of remarkably similar character. Each embodies the all-encompassing Army value of honor. Many say they live all of the Army values – loyalty, duty, respect, selfless service, honor, integrity and personal courage every day.
  • April

    8th Annual Air Potato Roundup raises awareness about invasive species

    Volunteers observed National Invasive Species Awareness Week in a “hands-on” way, by participating in the 8th Annual Air Potato Roundup March 1, hosted by the First Coast Invasive Working Group.
  • Working together to combat invasive species

    The Florida Invasive Species Partnership (FISP) is a collaborative group of federal, state and local agencies and non-government organizations, all with a stake in managing non-native species in Florida. As stated on the FISP website, “Because species can spread beyond fence lines, our goal is to connect private landowners and public land managers with invasive species expertise and assistance programs across boundaries...FISP increases communication, coordination and the sharing of resources to protect Florida's natural landscape.”
  • March

    Black History Month events engage and educate

    This year’s African American/Black History Month theme, “Civil Rights in America,” highlighted the 50th anniversary of the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. This landmark piece of civil rights legislation outlawed major forms of discrimination against racial, ethnic, national and religious minorities and women. It ended voter registration inequality and racial segregation in schools, workplaces and facilities that serve the general public.