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Author: Erica Skolte
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  • July

    Corps water safety volunteers save lives

    This is the first year Bill and Jamie Wagner have volunteered in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ water safety program, but they put on a show that leaves a lasting impression.
  • Florida II provides capability to perform important archaeological research

    The Florida II is a survey vessel, but it has the capability to provide much more information than just water depth. The design specifications and specialized equipment it carries make it possible to do many different types of surveys, and suitable for underwater archaeological research.
  • June

    Corps team members live the Army Values

    One man grew up in a small town in Virginia and the other was raised near New York City. Despite the differences in their backgrounds, they became men of remarkably similar character. Each embodies the all-encompassing Army value of honor. Many say they live all of the Army values – loyalty, duty, respect, selfless service, honor, integrity and personal courage every day.
  • April

    8th Annual Air Potato Roundup raises awareness about invasive species

    Volunteers observed National Invasive Species Awareness Week in a “hands-on” way, by participating in the 8th Annual Air Potato Roundup March 1, hosted by the First Coast Invasive Working Group.
  • Working together to combat invasive species

    The Florida Invasive Species Partnership (FISP) is a collaborative group of federal, state and local agencies and non-government organizations, all with a stake in managing non-native species in Florida. As stated on the FISP website, “Because species can spread beyond fence lines, our goal is to connect private landowners and public land managers with invasive species expertise and assistance programs across boundaries...FISP increases communication, coordination and the sharing of resources to protect Florida's natural landscape.”
  • March

    Black History Month events engage and educate

    This year’s African American/Black History Month theme, “Civil Rights in America,” highlighted the 50th anniversary of the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. This landmark piece of civil rights legislation outlawed major forms of discrimination against racial, ethnic, national and religious minorities and women. It ended voter registration inequality and racial segregation in schools, workplaces and facilities that serve the general public.
  • Corps shares water safety messages at south Florida events

    As the nation’s largest provider of water-based recreation with an important water safety mission, one of the most effective ways for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to promote its safety message is to take it to events where it will reach the maximum audience. In south Florida, this means hitting events like the annual South Florida Fair in West Palm Beach and the FLW fishing tournament.
  • Jacksonville District receives the AbilityOne Award at small business conference

    Lt. Gen. Thomas Bostick, commanding general of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, presented the AbilityOne Award to Jacksonville District Commander Col. Alan Dodd during the recent Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) Small Business Conference in Kansas City, Mo.
  • February

    And how was YOUR day at work?

    While conducting a routine site visit at the S-356 pump station on Tamiami Trail, Zoeller met an 11-foot long Burmese python face-to-face. Fortunately for her, Ruben Ramirez, founder of Florida Python Hunters, had just captured the invasive reptile nearby. Since it takes two hands to handle such a large, muscular, powerful snake, taking a “selfie” was out of the question. So Ramirez enlisted Zoeller’s help. Zoeller, who was on site as part of her normal operations, maintenance, repair, replacement and rehabilitation duties, was happy that she had not run into the large reptile on her own.
  • January

    The battle against invasive species rages on

    Invasive species management is much like fighting an ongoing war while battling multiple insurgencies. Once an area is cleared, constant, diligent defense against new and known invaders is needed to maintain the ground won. In Jacksonville District, the battle against invasive species rages on.
  • Big year for small business programs office

    "Small business is everyone's business." That is Beth Myers’ motto, and the philosophy she truly believes, lives and works by. As the deputy for the Small Business Programs Office, she knows that it is important for every member of Jacksonville District to understand and support the small business mission. Though she works with contractors and small businesses, one of Myers’ main jobs is to educate the district team. “It takes an entire team to work this program, not just my office,” she said.
  • December

    Invasive Species Management Branch ramps up outreach

    Invasive Species Management Branch ramps up outreach programs with social media.
  • Presentation on poisonous species benefits field staff safety

    Clewiston biologist Nicole Liette provided an overview of the many poisonous plants and animals in south Florida for South Florida Operations Office and lock employees who spend a lot of time outdoors or in the field,to help them be educated,alert,aware and safe during their normal duties in south Florida.
  • Corps retiree inspired others, left a lasting legacy

    In September 2013, Corps retiree Noble Enge’s sisters deeded land to North Florida Land Trust in his name, to ensure its permanent protection and preservation. The Noble Enge Trust encompasses 500 acres, much of it classic salt marsh habitat near and adjacent to the Nassau River on North Main Street in Jacksonville, Fla. within the Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve. "When you spend your life on a river, you can't help but want to see it preserved."
  • November

    Corps volunteers prepare for annual return of Purple Martins

    Along the Okeechobee Waterway, the return of the Purple Martins is one of the much-anticipated annual rites of spring. Corps volunteers have worked hard over the years to attract these delightful birds to Corps recreation areas for the enjoyment of all.
  • Jacksonville District savors the flavors with Hispanic Heritage Month Cook-Off

    In José Bilbao’s family, like many Hispanic families, food brings people together. “For most Hispanics, food is such an important part of our culture, history and way of life,” he said. “Families often come together, spend the day together and cook all day long.”
  • September

    Lake Okeechobee: Following the flow

    A diagram of Lake Okeechobee, with arrows that show water flowing into the lake from the north and flowing out of the lake to the east, west and south may look simple; however, the reality is much more complex.
  • August

    Independence Day on the Okeechobee Waterway

    The W.P. Franklin South Recreation Area in Alva was a popular destination on the July 4th weekend, receiving more than 2,000 visitors. The swim beach provided a welcome place for families to splash, play and stay cool.
  • Motorboat Operator training provides certification and skills needed to perform a wide range of duties

    In May and June, the South Florida Operations Office hosted a 32-hour motorboat licensing course and two 8-hour refresher courses at the W.P. Franklin Lock Recreation Area on the Okeechobee Waterway. Thirteen Jacksonville District employees participated in the program, designed to ensure that operators are adequately trained, properly tested and licensed prior to the official operation of any Corps boat or vessel less than 26 feet in length.
  • It’s a girl! Kitten born to rescued and released Florida panther

    In September 2011, a pair of orphaned five-month-old Florida panther kittens was rescued by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) biologists, after their mother was found dead. Too young to survive on their own, they were raised in captivity at White Oak Plantation in Yulee, Fla., with the goal of one day releasing them back into the wild.