US Army Corps of Engineers
Jacksonville District

Results:
Tag: water management
Clear
  • August

    Progress through working together

    The nation is at its best when we work together to tackle challenges that we face. We understand the frustration that many feel but do not lose sight of the fact that we are making tangible progress. With your continued valuable input, we will maintain the increasing momentum towards success. Working together, we can restore America’s Everglades and build an improved water management system that better meets the multiple water needs of Floridians in the 21st Century and beyond.
  • June

    Why we release water

    One of the primary reasons we release water is to reduce flood risk for people living and working around the lake, in which the potential for inflows far exceeds (six times greater) our capacity for outflow.
  • May

    Lake O water levels fall to start 2017

    An extended period of dry weather since Hurricane Matthew in October has caused the water level in Lake Okeechobee to steadily recede over the past six months. This, in sharp comparison to last year’s dry season that contained some of the wettest months ever recorded in the region.
  • July

    Corps must remain vigilant in managing Lake O

    Water—in south Florida, we either have too much or too little. For most of 2016, heavy rains fueled by El Nino mean we’ve had too much. The flood control system operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the South Florida Water Management District has prevented loss of life and major widespread property damage so far this year. However, we remain concerned about how much rain may fall and where that water can go without causing impacts that have the potential to be worse than current conditions in south Florida estuaries.
  • Water managers prepare for wet season

    An early start to the wet season in 2013 kept the lake from dropping below 13 feet – its lowest point last year was 13.29 feet on May 27. The loss of water storage capacity became evident when the lake started rising, and the district was left with little choice but to discharge the water in case a tropical system developed that would result in additional heavy rains.
  • May

    Water managers prepare for wet season

    A different challenge facing water managers this year surrounds Lake Okeechobee and a higher water level this year, when compared to the previous two years. On April 23, the lake level was 13.59 feet, more than two feet higher than it was on the same date in 2011 and 2012. The lake has stayed within the Corps’ preferred range of 12.5 and 15.5 feet all winter. As a result, the district has been able to provide regular discharges of water to meet a wide variety of needs, including releases to the Caloosahatchee Estuary to keep the saltwater-freshwater mix in an acceptable range.
  • April

    USACE begins Dam Safety Modification Study on Herbert Hoover Dike

    “The Dam Safety Modification Study is a comprehensive, system-wide study intended to identify risks in the system, and to recommend the necessary measures that can reduce the risk of failure,” said Tim Willadsen, HHD project manager. While certain sections of the dike have been studied before, HHD has never undergone a review this comprehensive and detailed. Each segment of the dike will be thoroughly reviewed for its geology and geometry, with particular attention given to scenarios that would cause the dike to fail.
  • January

    Milestones reached at Herbert Hoover Dike as dedication to water management balance continues

    The past year saw both low water and high water at Lake Okeechobee, as well as completion of one project and the start of others on Herbert Hoover Dike (HHD). The best news occurred in October, when the last section of cutoff wall in the dike between Port Mayaca and Belle Glade was accepted by Jacksonville District construction representatives. The action meant 21.4 miles of cutoff wall that had been under construction since 2007 was in place, reducing the risk of failure for the southeast portion of the dike.