US Army Corps of Engineers
Jacksonville District

Results:
Tag: Florida
Clear
  • November

    A successful year for Lake Okeechobee

    At this time last year, Jacksonville District was a month into executing operational flexibility for Lake Okeechobee aimed at drawing the lake down. What a difference a year makes.
  • August

    Progress through working together

    The nation is at its best when we work together to tackle challenges that we face. We understand the frustration that many feel but do not lose sight of the fact that we are making tangible progress. With your continued valuable input, we will maintain the increasing momentum towards success. Working together, we can restore America’s Everglades and build an improved water management system that better meets the multiple water needs of Floridians in the 21st Century and beyond.
  • June

    Why we release water

    One of the primary reasons we release water is to reduce flood risk for people living and working around the lake, in which the potential for inflows far exceeds (six times greater) our capacity for outflow.
  • January

    Additional progress on Everglades restoration expected in 2018

    Jacksonville District Commander Col. Jason Kirk provides an update on ecosystem restoration activities in south Florida.
  • May

    Lake O water levels fall to start 2017

    An extended period of dry weather since Hurricane Matthew in October has caused the water level in Lake Okeechobee to steadily recede over the past six months. This, in sharp comparison to last year’s dry season that contained some of the wettest months ever recorded in the region.
  • February

    Focus on STEM during National Engineers Week

    As the commander and District Engineer of the Jacksonville District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and its 800-strong team of scientists, engineers and other professionals, I encourage everyone to celebrate and recognize the important contributions of science, technology, engineering and mathematics professionals during this year’s National Engineers Week — February 19-25. This is also a great week to encourage young people from all walks of life to consider a career in one of these vital “STEM” fields.
  • August

    Project partnership agreements finalized for two Everglades projects

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District has finalized two critical agreements for ecosystem restoration projects in the Florida Everglades. The project partnership agreements (PPAs) cover the Broward County Water Preserve Areas and Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands projects, two Everglades restoration projects that were authorized in the Water Resources Reform and Development Act of 2014.
  • November

    Making tomorrow better — An introduction to the Jacksonville District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    I took command of the Jacksonville District in July of this year — I’m very proud of the district — its past accomplishments, the work we are doing now, and most importantly the important work ahead of us. The mission of our district is to deliver value to the Nation by anticipating needs and collaboratively engineering solutions that support national security, energize our economy and increase resiliency.
  • July

    Turner visits south Florida

    USACE South Atlantic Division Commander Brig. Gen. David Turner visited ecosystem restoration and flood risk reduction projects in south Florida on June 23-24.
  • June

    Partners Celebrate the Sand on Venice Beach

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers joined our partners to celebrate the completion of the Venice Beach renourishment project at “Celebrate the Sand” Friday, June 5 on Venice Beach.
  • December

    Corps attends south Florida outreach event

    Corps park ranger Brian Scott Older and water safety volunteers Michael and Terri Young, exhibited at Kiwanis Kids Day in Labelle, Florida educating attendees about the Corps’ mission and water safety. LaBelle is located along the Caloosahatchee River, which is part of the Okeechobee Waterway on the west side of Lake Okeechobee in south Florida.
  • May

    CEPP may have hit speedbump but is far from dead

    April 30, 2014Last week, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works Review Board (CWRB) decided to
  • December

    Rangers educate boaters on Okeechobee Waterway anchoring policy

    Jacksonville District park rangers along the Okeechobee Waterway are educating boaters on navigation and anchoring policies adopted to promote safety.
  • These noses know no limits

    Don is a five-year-old German Shepherd, one of several explosive detection dogs that are working alongside their handlers at the Mullet Key Formerly Used Defense Site (FUDS) at Fort DeSoto Park in Pinellas County near St. Petersburg, Fla.
  • Presentation on poisonous species benefits field staff safety

    Clewiston biologist Nicole Liette provided an overview of the many poisonous plants and animals in south Florida for South Florida Operations Office and lock employees who spend a lot of time outdoors or in the field,to help them be educated,alert,aware and safe during their normal duties in south Florida.
  • September

    Lake Okeechobee: Following the flow

    A diagram of Lake Okeechobee, with arrows that show water flowing into the lake from the north and flowing out of the lake to the east, west and south may look simple; however, the reality is much more complex.
  • Operation Warfighter Program benefits local Soldier, Jacksonville District

    A 15-month deployment, especially a first deployment, does not typically involve tours in three
  • August

    South American lizards slither into south Florida

    Hailing from South America, the tegu, an exotic lizard, has made its way into the Sunshine State and is now considered to be established in the south Florida region.
  • It’s a girl! Kitten born to rescued and released Florida panther

    In September 2011, a pair of orphaned five-month-old Florida panther kittens was rescued by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) biologists, after their mother was found dead. Too young to survive on their own, they were raised in captivity at White Oak Plantation in Yulee, Fla., with the goal of one day releasing them back into the wild.
  • District supports local STEM initiative

    In an effort to pique the interest of middle school students toward science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) disciplines, Jacksonville District partnered with Mentoring Families and Kids, Inc., (MFK) at the Second Annual STEM Camp, held at the University of North Florida, June 28.