US Army Corps of Engineers
Jacksonville District

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  • August

    Progress through working together

    The nation is at its best when we work together to tackle challenges that we face. We understand the frustration that many feel but do not lose sight of the fact that we are making tangible progress. With your continued valuable input, we will maintain the increasing momentum towards success. Working together, we can restore America’s Everglades and build an improved water management system that better meets the multiple water needs of Floridians in the 21st Century and beyond.
  • June

    Why we release water

    One of the primary reasons we release water is to reduce flood risk for people living and working around the lake, in which the potential for inflows far exceeds (six times greater) our capacity for outflow.
  • January

    Additional progress on Everglades restoration expected in 2018

    Jacksonville District Commander Col. Jason Kirk provides an update on ecosystem restoration activities in south Florida.
  • August

    Project partnership agreements finalized for two Everglades projects

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District has finalized two critical agreements for ecosystem restoration projects in the Florida Everglades. The project partnership agreements (PPAs) cover the Broward County Water Preserve Areas and Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands projects, two Everglades restoration projects that were authorized in the Water Resources Reform and Development Act of 2014.
  • April

    Army Corps of Engineers: Restoring the Environment, Increasing Resiliency

    As commander of the Jacksonville District's 780-member team of professionals, I want to share information about our efforts to restore the environment and to help our nation face the challenges posed by rising sea levels.
  • December

    Jacksonville District hosts Minister of Chinese Water Resources on a tour of America's Everglades

    A delegation of senior water management officials from the People’s Republic of China, including the Minister of Water Resources, toured the Everglades with representatives of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and partner agencies. The group discussed processes and progress in the United States’ largest ecosystem restoration program.
  • Jacksonville District hosts Minister of Chinese Water Resources on a tour of America's Everglades

    A delegation of senior water management officials from the People’s Republic of China, including the Minister of Water Resources, toured the Everglades with representatives of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and partner agencies. The group discussed processes and progress in the United States’ largest ecosystem restoration program.
  • Completion of major Everglades restoration construction contract celebrated at Picayune Strand

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District celebrated the completion of a major construction effort for the Picayune Strand Restoration project Oct. 24 alongside federal, state and local representatives and Everglades restoration supporters.
  • June

    Eight Jacksonville District projects receive congressional authorization

    Eight U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District projects that will provide critical infrastructure to local ports and ecosystem restoration efforts in Florida received approval as part of the Water Resources Reform and Development Act (WRRDA) of 2014, which was signed into law June 10.
  • May

    CEPP may have hit speedbump but is far from dead

    April 30, 2014Last week, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works Review Board (CWRB) decided to
  • February

    And how was YOUR day at work?

    While conducting a routine site visit at the S-356 pump station on Tamiami Trail, Zoeller met an 11-foot long Burmese python face-to-face. Fortunately for her, Ruben Ramirez, founder of Florida Python Hunters, had just captured the invasive reptile nearby. Since it takes two hands to handle such a large, muscular, powerful snake, taking a “selfie” was out of the question. So Ramirez enlisted Zoeller’s help. Zoeller, who was on site as part of her normal operations, maintenance, repair, replacement and rehabilitation duties, was happy that she had not run into the large reptile on her own.
  • January

    Construction Division accomplishes big things in 2013; prepares for bigger 2014

    In 2013, the Construction Division was involved in more than ensuring that authorized projects were built; they were also involved in another type of construction project. They were rebuilding the division.
  • October

    Corps awards final pump station contract for Picayune Strand restoration

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District has awarded the construction contract for the third and final pump station for the Picayune Strand Restoration Project in Collier County, Fla.
  • Public input received during series of public meetings for Central Everglades Planning Project

    Five public meetings were held throughout south Florida Sept. 16-19 and Sept. 25 to discuss the draft report. Meeting attendants ranged from environmental, agricultural and recreational interest groups to high school students and local residents.
  • September

    “River of Interests” is first Corps publication honored by American Library Association

    In June 2013, Jacksonville District’s “River of Interests: Water Management in South Florida and the Everglades, 1948-2010” became the first U.S. Army Corps of Engineers publication to be placed on the American Library Association’s (ALA) 2012 Notable Documents list. It was one of 20 federal publications to be so honored.
  • June

    Laurel wilt – a possible threat to Everglades restoration

    First discovered in 2005 in Duval County, laurel wilt disease has since spread south and is covering a vast section of Tamiami Trail, potentially threatening the Everglades. The disease, caused by a fungus transmitted by the invasive redbay ambrosia beetle, kills avocado and other trees in the laurel family
  • May

    Giant African snails attack south Florida

    The giant African land snail (GALS) is considered one of the most damaging snails in the world, known to consume at least 500 different types of plants and possibly pose a health threat to humans, according to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) website.
  • March

    Reaching out in South Florida

    Reaching out to the communities we serve, to engage them by providing information as well as seeking their input on our projects and processes, is a basic tenet of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District. From formal meetings about the Central Everglades Planning Project to participating in community-based events, the Jacksonville District team is continuously engaged in a multitude of public interactions in south Florida.
  • February

    Burmese pythons threaten native species and restoration efforts

    A hunt for Burmese pythons in south Florida is not a hoax; this non-native invasive species is threatening Everglades ecosystem restoration efforts and native wildlife. The one-month ‘Python Challenge’ organized by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission allows anyone older than 18 to hunt the snakes on state land. Burmese pythons are exceptionally difficult to locate, due to their camouflaging capabilities. The ISM branch has initiated efforts to detect the pythons by using dogs and thermal energy remote sensing by an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV).
  • January

    Federal, state partners celebrate completion of key component in Everglades restoration

    Federal and state partners celebrated the completion of a key component in improving freshwater deliveries to the southern end of the Everglades ecosystem Jan. 11 in Homestead, Fla., at the C-111 Spreader Canal Western Project Dedication Ceremony.