US Army Corps of Engineers
Jacksonville District

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Author: Col. Jason Kirk, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District Commander
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  • August

    Progress through working together

    The nation is at its best when we work together to tackle challenges that we face. We understand the frustration that many feel but do not lose sight of the fact that we are making tangible progress. With your continued valuable input, we will maintain the increasing momentum towards success. Working together, we can restore America’s Everglades and build an improved water management system that better meets the multiple water needs of Floridians in the 21st Century and beyond.
  • June

    Why we release water

    One of the primary reasons we release water is to reduce flood risk for people living and working around the lake, in which the potential for inflows far exceeds (six times greater) our capacity for outflow.
  • July

    Corps continues to advance efforts in south Florida

    JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- This time last year the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District was managing a challenging scenario fueled by heavy rains during the dry season and early part of the wet season, forcing us to release billions of gallons of water from Lake Okeechobee to protect the Herbert Hoover Dike. One year later, I‘d like to highlight the progress we have made and how we intend to address challenges that remain.
  • Corps must remain vigilant in managing Lake O

    Water—in south Florida, we either have too much or too little. For most of 2016, heavy rains fueled by El Nino mean we’ve had too much. The flood control system operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the South Florida Water Management District has prevented loss of life and major widespread property damage so far this year. However, we remain concerned about how much rain may fall and where that water can go without causing impacts that have the potential to be worse than current conditions in south Florida estuaries.
  • April

    Army Corps of Engineers: Restoring the Environment, Increasing Resiliency

    As commander of the Jacksonville District's 780-member team of professionals, I want to share information about our efforts to restore the environment and to help our nation face the challenges posed by rising sea levels.