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Invasive Species

The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers promotes an ecosystem approach to environmental stewardship. This management philosophy includes conservation, preservation and restoration of the lands and waters entrusted to the USACE, as well as those under its regulatory authority. Therefore, in order to conserve, preserve and restore these lands and waters it is necessary to manage and control invasive species.

An "invasive species" is defined by Executive Order 13112 as a species that is, 1) non-native (or alien/exotic) to the ecosystem under consideration, and 2) whose introduction causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm or harm to human health.

   

 

 water hyacinth
Water Hyacinth
 Hydrilla
Hydrilla

 Water Lettuce
Water Lettuce

 Old World Climbing Fern
Old World Climbing Fern

 Brazilian Pepper
Brazilian Pepper

 salt cedar
Salt Cedar

Invasive species can be plants, animals, and other organisms (e.g., microbes). They threaten our nation's natural resources, prevent or seriously hinder navigation, adversely affect flood risk management, hydropower generation, water supply, and limit recreation use by the public. The economic costs are staggering, and introductions of new invasive species continues. As a result of centuries of habitat manipulation and plant and animal introductions (both intentional and accidental), numerous species have been allowed to reach invasive and/or nuisance status and threaten the integrity our ecosystems. These species present a management challenge to the USACE. 

sailfin catfish 
Sailfin Catfish
zebra mussel 
Zebra Mussel
 purple swamp hen
Purple Swamp Hen
 Nile monitor
Nile Monitor
 asian carp
Asian Carp
 Burmese Python
Burmese Python